[Been Painting] A Pale Rose, a Reference, and a Large Arboreal Friend

Well, I did it!

Hot off the heels of OWAC IV, my second army what I dun painted in the last six months.

With one weekend to go until Resurrection I have slapped some paint on every member of the Deadwood Covenant, or at least enough of them to make a 2000 point army.

Kinband of the Pale Rose: 20 Eternal Guard

These were a bit of a bugaboo, which I actively avoided doing anything about for oh, at least a fortnight. I’m still not Sure about them as models, these Oathmark Elf Infantry. They look a bit too High Elven for me, even with only one helmet in the unit. A lot of their faces have blobbled a bit, the Technique having failed me, and they badly need some differentiation in hair colour. But they are three-colours-done and I can take them to a tournament and that’s what I set out to achieve.

“I’m Gwydion…”
“… and I’m the Druid.”

Much happier with these two. While Gwydion is every bit as heroic scale as I’d feared, he IS the last unbargained scion of his line and can afford to be a bit larger than life. He is a hero, after all: the point around which the Asrai of Deadwood rally.

The Druid, meanwhile, represents something of an evaporation of gumption on my part. I’d intended to go without Lords, but in need of Dispel dice, better Leadership, and options in the magic department not dependent on trees, I caved and sought out a Spellweaver. The prospect of playing fifth edition, and thus securing access to High Magic, was merely gravy.

Uchelwydd…

This was… bigger than my usual figure. I tried a few things to add textural variety, a bit of Typhus Corrosion blended in here and there, the deeper blue showing underneath the major logs. I also built the base up with ye olde Milliput so his feet had something to anchor into, rather than just the little points of contact with his fetching high heels. If that doesn’t work, it’s time for MAGNETS, but I’m hoping they won’t be necessary.

[40K] To All The Orks Wot I Have Left Behind

Waaagh It All Began

Second edition 40K is technically where I came in.

I didn’t really play properly – I must have set up and played the Battle for Armageddon scenarios (compressed onto a barely 3′ by 2′ folding table) half a dozen times in my grandparents’ house, but other than that I think I played two chaotic games against other eleven year olds who had even less grasp of the rules than I did and hadn’t even bothered with “army lists” or “staying within one Codex”.

SOMETHING about it had me by the throat, though. I think it was the sheer density of the thing: the rich, vibrant, busy art style; the encyclopaedic Wargear and Codex Imperialis books alongside the rules; the short fiction, some of it really haunting in how it portrayed the futility of life in the forty-first millennium (‘Griznak at the Bridge’ gave an Ork a kind of self-doubting, self-aware tragedy you’d never see in today’s tie-ins, and ‘Dark Communion’ is still the essence of Chaos for me) all the damn cards and templates, some of them for strange weapons I would never see fired in anger. And dear god, some of those rules were complex, some of that art was grim!

I know there was hue and cry on the early-days domestic Internet about GW “dumbing down for the kids” with the rise of the Kirby era box sets (my first Internet fight was with one Christopher Valera over his Burger Workshop pastiche, when I was one of those very kids and defending the space opera genre with intensity only the barely pubescent can muster – I doubt he remembers, and I would prefer not to). Having looked from third edition WFB to fourth I can see where that came from, but I’m not sure how it sits with 40K. Second edition 40K was a complicated beast for an eleven year old to grasp, and artwork like the Pontifex Maximus (which still gives me the conniptions to this day!) still made it in.

I played Necromunda, though, and found the rules (especially hand to hand combat – sweet mercy, what a mess that was!) much more accessible when single models were targeting single models. I suppose that’s what I really remember second edition as, in retrospect: rules for individuals, creaking and groaning as whole squads were forced through them. It took another go around for 40K’s developers to work out how it needed to be more than Fantasy In Space: the increased complexity of movement/placement, and the varied weapon loadouts in squads, were accommodated by knocking out the modifiers and conditions that applied much more smoothly to a regiment.

But all of this is just preamble. You see: I collected Orks. They were also in the box and Adrian Wood’s piece about his own army was in my first ever White Dwarf and look, Space Marines just seemed boring. The Orks were in this for a good time, a bunch of lads doing their best in a hostile universe. They had Gretchin with silly names, they had the comedy voices, they had that cool as shit Dreadnought with the four arms. And nobody wanted all of theirs so I ended up with a lot of extra figures.

No photos of that Goff army survive. This was 1996, and nobody was about to waste physical film on taking (bad) photographs of toys.

Continue reading “[40K] To All The Orks Wot I Have Left Behind”

[WFB] Battle Report – Another Step on the Road to Resurrection

2000 points | Pitched Battle | Wood Elves vs. Skaven

And so it came to pass that the People’s Prince had an unexpected two weeks off work and of course he messaged me asking when my days off were and, long and the short of it, no bones etcetera, we ended up at Bristol Independent Gaming once again for another tournament battle.

I knew Ben was in with a good chance this time because a) I was exhausted, my insomnia got me coming and going this weekend and b) he was bringing Skaven. They outshoot my archers, they have M5 or better across the board so we’re playing charge range chicken with the Eternal Guard, and Warp Lightning is basically “roll two dice and remove that many Dryads” if it goes off.

Continue reading “[WFB] Battle Report – Another Step on the Road to Resurrection”

[WFB] Battle Report – The Road to Resurrection

2000 points | Pitched Battle | Wood Elves vs. High Elves

With a week off work and Warhammer: Resurrection on the horizon (still touch and go whether the event can go ahead or not, but we’re assuming yes until we hear no), it was about damn time I took the Deadwood Covenant out for a spin against a real live other person. People’s Prince Ben was available with his usual Elves of a rather loftier persuasion (he also brought Skaven, but under the circumstances we opted for one solid, considered, properly documented game). The venue was a recently re-opened Bristol Independent Gaming, and a pleasure it was to be back there too.

Continue reading “[WFB] Battle Report – The Road to Resurrection”

[WFB] Battle Report – The Maven & The Witch, Chapter IV – Season Of The Witch

1200 / 600 points | Rear Guard | Wood Elves vs. Vampire Counts

My original plan for this one was to stage a nice big climactic Ambush scenario, but then I actually bothered to read the rules for that one and realised it was built for a 6′ by 4′ table; I could only get away with it by so compressing the Undead deployment zone into a straight line, and we already played that one last week…

So I went back to basics: look at the board, think about the story, choose something that works. I’d been hacking at the scenario trying to encourage the Undead into moving for one specific table quarter, containing the Heart of the Forest; what I needed was a scenario that turned on one specific table quarter, and cast one army in a position of desperation (after the stonking the Undead had taken so far).

Rear Guard it was.

Continue reading “[WFB] Battle Report – The Maven & The Witch, Chapter IV – Season Of The Witch”