[WFB] Battle Report – The Road to Resurrection

2000 points. Pitched Battle. Hold your breath: tournament prep.

With a week off work and Warhammer: Resurrection on the horizon (still touch and go whether the event can go ahead or not, but we’re assuming yes until we hear no), it was about damn time I took the Deadwood Covenant out for a spin against a real live other person. People’s Prince Ben was available with his usual Elves of a rather loftier persuasion (he also brought Skaven, but under the circumstances we opted for one solid, considered, properly documented game). The venue was a recently re-opened Bristol Independent Gaming, and a pleasure it was to be back there too.

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[WFB] Battle Report – The Maven & The Witch, Chapter IV – Season Of The Witch

Rearguard scenario. 1200 points of Wood Elves vs. 600 points of Vampire Counts.

My original plan for this one was to stage a nice big climactic Ambush scenario, but then I actually bothered to read the rules for that one and realised it was built for a 6′ by 4′ table; I could only get away with it by so compressing the Undead deployment zone into a straight line, and we already played that one last week…

So I went back to basics: look at the board, think about the story, choose something that works. I’d been hacking at the scenario trying to encourage the Undead into moving for one specific table quarter, containing the Heart of the Forest; what I needed was a scenario that turned on one specific table quarter, and cast one army in a position of desperation (after the stonking the Undead had taken so far).

Rear Guard it was.

Continue reading “[WFB] Battle Report – The Maven & The Witch, Chapter IV – Season Of The Witch”

[WFB] Battle Report: The Maven & The Witch, Chapter III – A Maven’s Folly

Woodland Ambush scenario (Warhammer Armies: Wood Elves): 600 points Wood Elves vs. 1200 points Tomb Kings

The Premise

The woods were waking up. Slow, sluggish, breathing deep and laboured in the perpetual cold, but clawing their way to life and fury, answering the Maven’s call.

Her allies had answered, better late than never; the kinbands of the Black-Briar crept at her side, arrows nocked. Her sisters strode at her back, and in the whisper of leaves she heard that others were on their way, drifting down from the high vale beyond the river.

And the dead were coming. Score by score, bony feet shuffling through the snow. One clutched an old bronze blade to its chest; one had its head thrown back, its hollow throat raised in a dreadful monotone chant.

There was no time to wake her brothers, no time to wait for the Court. The Heart was in peril and the time to act was now.

Continue reading “[WFB] Battle Report: The Maven & The Witch, Chapter III – A Maven’s Folly”

[WFB] The Platonic Ideal

I have, in the past, had some things to say about pick-up gaming, tournament practice, Pitched Battle and the unsatisfactory takeaway of the soul that this kind of setup tends to result in. Of course, it’s very easy to thump one’s tub on the dot-coms and tell people they’re doing Warhammer wrong, which is why I’ve decided to “share best practice” like what my teacher training taught me to do.

What follows is an attempt to lead by example: a wargaming day myself and Mr. Ben staged in the summer of 2019 before the borders were closed and Trafnidiaeth Cymru nerfed into the ground. As hosting player, I had a look through the available resources and picked some scenarios appropriate to the participants, the terrain, and the timeframe we had available.

The forces in these little engagements are my Tomb Kings, in their embryonic “first attempt at a paint job” state, and Ben’s Skaven, in their “what do you mean you’re doing another new army” launch condition. The terrain selection is the Age of Sigmar stuff I acquired in a good-faith attempt to give Soul Wars a go during my year off blogging. The timeframe was a long afternoon, kicking off about noon and ending about six with late lunch at the local hostelry. (We’d reserved the evening for a round of Drunkhammer featuring our “main” armies, and that may see the light of day at some point too.)

I – The Border Patrol

(Rules for which can be found in Warhammer Chronicles 2004, if you’re interested. A Border Patrol usually takes sixty minutes or less to play, if you’re on form and keep your bustle hustled.)

This little encounter represented a Skaven incursion into the outer reaches of the necropolis of Rasetra. The scenery was set up to suggest the outer edge of a poorly fortified settlement; we had a house rule that attacking Skaven units could charge the fences and spend a combat phase knocking them down, as they weren’t terribly robust. The forces were deployed in opposite corners because that made most sense with the orientation of the buildings (and corner deployment always makes a nice change).

Ben lost this one. This is mostly because the Screaming Skull Catapult is very, very good at panicking Skaven units and the compulsory Liche Priest did nothing but ensure it could shoot twice every turn. Some Clanrats did make it some way into the Necropolis and regained a little glory by beating up my Skeleton Archers, but it wasn’t to last. All of this meant I would be setting up second and going first in the final game, as the Tomb Kings seized the initiative above ground.

II – The Skirmish

For our second game we played the Lost Tomb of Hamon Ra scenario from Warhammer Skirmish (the book of scenarios which expands on the Skirmish rules in the core manual; I believe most of it’s available in other forms online).

Some jimmying of the forces to suit available models was required – I had an Ushabti instead of the two Tomb Swarm bases – and we house ruled a little regarding the “crumble” moment, allowing my Tomb Prince a small radius of Leadership to keep some of his associates on their feet after my Liche Priest was destroyed.

Victory for the Skaven would deny the Tomb Kings 10% of their forces in the final battle (and if we’d been playing 2000 points as we originally hoped to, would also deny me the Crown of Kings).

The scenery here is set up to denote the outer walls of the Tomb and provide some internal decoration. There’s not a great deal of cover, although we were generous regarding figures stood immediately behind a sarcophagus or gravestone.

We were at this one for something like two hours as models fluffed hit rolls, wound rolls, injury rolls, and the endless loop of “can’t disengage from melee, can’t roll fives or sixes” set in. In retrospect I now know that Mordheim has a workaround for this (knocked down or stunned models are automatically taken out if wounded) and if Skirmish doesn’t have that I advise bringing it in. The other option is playing Warbands instead: Warbands has the traditional “fail save, lose last wound, you’re dead” resolution and tends to result in faster, more decisive games.

On the flipside, Skirmish also generates moments of real excitement, as even the disposable single-wound trooper can roll over, dust themself down and stage a comeback.

In our game the Skaven Assassin gave his all to destroy the Liche Priest, only to be cut down by a Tomb Prince moments later, and it was a mere Clanrat who retrieved the prize and dodged past an enraged Ushabti to make his final break for the surface, a lone survivor carrying the treasure of the Tomb.

(Ben won, that’s what I’m trying to say here.)

III – The Battle

With the Crown in the hands of the Skaven, we opted for a Breakthrough scenario, in which the Rodents of Unusual Size attempted to make their escape with their ill-gotten gains. I only had 1500 points of Tomb Kings so 1500 points is what we played, or rather 1500 vs 1350 as I’d lost the second game. I think I left out two Ushabti and my Icon Bearer’s magic flag. The terrain was essentially a flip of the first encounter; this time the Skaven would have the open space and the Tomb Kings holding the line on the fenced side of the battlefield.

I don’t really remember much about this game other than struggling to get anything done magically (turns out one Liche Priest isn’t enough at 1500 points, especially against two Warlock Engineers) and my Catapult not putting in the same sterling performance (only one shot per turn and an early misfire). It only went to about four turns – once my Ushabti had folded I didn’t have the speed to close off every avenue of assault and most of Ben’s army had free reign to move off the board.

What I do remember is the context of it. Because we’d set it up with the distraction raid and the temple pillaging, there were mechanical twists to an otherwise routine engagement, rewards for having done well in the early stages. Continuity was furthered by the terrain we used for the first and third battles.

Beyond that, because Ben won (again), my Tomb Kings now have something to do with themselves in future encounters, to whit going out to recover the Crown or maybe fighting their way home after having done so. All my future games with Ben, and maybe the entire backstory of my new army, can be shaped by the outcome of this only-slightly-curated day of play.

All of this was done with by-the-book armies, published scenarios, and terrain I already owned. I don’t think I’d even named my characters at the time! No extraordinary or even especial effort on our part was called for – we were just curious and selective about the wealth of additional material on offer in sixth edition WFB.

We could have simply played a Breakthrough scenario at 1500 points, and when we might have three people wanting a game each on neutral ground with strict departure times hanging over our head, that’s the sort of thing we settle for. But if you have the opportunity to do even a little prelude or aftermath for a game, to make a day of it and weave a little context and set the scenario up as something more than yet another points matched game of Borehammer, I heartily recommend you do so.

[WFB] Battle Report: The Maven & The Witch, Chapter II – Grave Disorder

Warhammer Skirmish; Vampire Hunt scenario, hacked for speed running.

The Hacks

I compressed the battlefield down to 2 feet square, as before; removed the attackers’ supporting troops, as injury rolls have a tendency to bloat and delay the Skirmish experience; and I gave the Vampire a set location and set her victory condition to “escape” rather than “kill they heroes.”

The Premise

Thaniel had told his story three times in two days. Once to himself, as he hurried through the deep pathways of Deadwood, so fast and so far that even his sure elven feet had betrayed him here and there. Once to Rychell, and the veteran had nodded gravely and led him up here…

He knew the Court. He knew what to expect. But it was still a strange feeling, to see four gnarled and blasted stumps and to stand at the point between them, to address them by name and to watch as flesh flickered out of splinter and shadow, as the lords and ladies of Deadwood came back to hear the tale.

Mostly. Prince Hwel had not come, and Thaniel was grateful for that small mercy.

“It happens to us all,” Lord Gwydion said, and “not to me” Lord Gilfaethwy said, and that had been an end to Thaniel’s apologies. The Lady Bloddeuwydd had said nothing at all, until Thaniel’s tale was told, and then:

“Grimgroth did not raise himself from the dead. His crown was taken. His will was broken. Someone broke those seals; someone stirred him up and set him loose.”

Some interloper,” said the Lord Gilfaethwy, and “some necromancer,” said the Lord Gwydion.

Someone who has roused the Maven’s wrath. We must honour the covenant. But we must know how deep the rot goes; if we are beset from within. Brothers; will you go to the Tombs?”

And you to the Heart?” said the Lord Gwydion, “with all haste and all our strength?” said the Lord Gilfaethwy.

The Lady Bloddeuwydd bowed her head, and rose in a rustle of roots, a shiver of snowfall. “Ahead of the Maven, if I can,” she said, “and with Thaniel.”

Continue reading “[WFB] Battle Report: The Maven & The Witch, Chapter II – Grave Disorder”

[WFB] Battle Report: The Maven & The Witch Chapter I – Ghosts in the Fog

Warhammer Warbands (200 points); A Little War scenario; objectives were Hold Territory (Wood Elves) and Invade! (Vampire Counts)

The Premise

Grimgroth opened his eyes.

Was it time? Had the bell been rung, its doleful peal sounding the Time of Ending? He swung slowly off his graven slab and took up his axe and followed the breeze out of his tumulus. His huscarls were stirring, skinless hands closing on sword-hilt and shield-grip, as they followed him into the twilight of the gods, and also of the sky.

Grimgroth closed his eyes, then opened them again, dessicated lids flapping in ponderous amazement, then closed them again to have a good hard think.

Who had put those bloody trees there? When he had been laid down to rest, all this had been fields; the fields of High Tiernmas of old.

Now he was starting to remember. There had been… others. In the long winter that had never seemed to end. The elves had come. They had put Tiernmas to flight. They had relieved Grimgroth of his kingdom, his crown and his life, in that approximate order, almost in the one day. They had sealed him into the tomb dug for him long ago.

Grimgroth opened his eyes. He kicked away the carrion-eater who was reaching out a filthy calloused paw for one of his favourite toes; the ghoul fled, yelping, into the woods. Yes. The woods. Through the woods and out, out into the world. Out to glory, for the Old Kingdom. And they’d put a stop to any Time of Ending that happened to be going on, and all.

Continue reading “[WFB] Battle Report: The Maven & The Witch Chapter I – Ghosts in the Fog”

[WFB] Battle Report: Lord Ruthven’s Reanimation

My second engagement on the eve of Nineteen Crows was something equally eccentric, and this time I have slightly more adequate notes. Joseph Bain of tournament fame had suggested Reclaim the Stones, a scenario from the Albion campaign: always keen to skip out the Borehammer, I’d accepted his vulgar challenge. Although I was going in with 3000 points to his 2000 I would be doing so with a split-up Vampire Counts army (never a good idea) and Joseph had tricked out his list to give me a run for my money in the magic department.

He had:

Wizard Lord of the Celestial College: level 4 wizard (Lore of the Heavens: Second Sign of Amul, Storm of Kronos, Comet of Cassandora and… something else), Hex Staff
Warrior-Priest of Sigmar: heavy armour, shield, barded warhorse, Sword of Might, Van Horstman’s Speculum
Warrior-Priest of Sigmar: great weapon, Armour of Meteoric Iron
Master Engineer: repeater pistol

8 Knights of the Inner Circle: full cavalry kit, champion, musician, and standard bearer (War Banner)
10 Handgunners
10 Handgunners
5 Pistoliers: champion

18 Greatswords: champion, musician, and standard bearer (Griffon Standard)
Mortar
Great Cannon

Helblaster Volley Gun
Giant

I was rocking:

Margarita: Vampire Countess; level 2 wizard (Lore of Death: Dark Hand, Steal Soul, Doom and Darkness), Sword of Striking, Ring of the Night, Spell Familiar and Summon Wolves.
The Master: Master Necromancer: level 4 wizard (Necromancy: Invocation of Nehek, Hand of Dust, Gaze of Nagash, Vanhel’s Danse Macabre), Wristbands of Black Gold, Black Periapt
Rosenkratz: Necromancer: level 2 wizard (Necromancy: Invocation of Nehek, Vanhel’s Danse Macabre), Book of Arkhan, Power Stone
Guildenstern: Necromancer: level 2 wizard (Necromancy: Invocation of Nehek, Vanhel’s Danse Macabre), Rod of Flaming Death
Whispering Nell: Wraith: Cursed Book
Walravius: Wight Lord: Army Standard, Flayed Hauberk

Templehof Militia: 30 Skeletons with light armour, spears, champion, standard and musician
Templehof Levy: 25 Zombies with standard and musician
Hounds of Verhungern: 10 Dire Wolves with champion
The Local People: 10 Ghouls with champion

Drakenhof Templars: 12 Black Knights with barding, champion, standard (Banner of the Barrows) and musician
Black Monks of St. Herod: 5 Spirit Hosts

Cora: Banshee
Clarice: Banshee
Lord Ruthven’s Repose: Black Coach

The scenario forced me to split my army down the middle and with only one General to go around that made the choice of what to slap where pretty straightforward.

The A Team, consisting of everything that either can’t march (the Black Coach), can march regardless of proximity to the General (Ghouls), or is fast enough to reach combat even if it doesn’t march (Black Knights, Dire Wolves), plus the Master to give everything a bit of a Necromantic fillip. I wasn’t particularly optimistic about this flank’s chances but if they could corral Joseph’s army to an extent until the infantry showed up to win the game for me I’d be happy.

The B team, consisting of everything which needed proximity to the General (that’s Spirit Hosts, Skeletons and Zombies) plus everything that would want to hide in a Skeleton or Zombie unit (that’s all the characters except the Master). I also deployed the Banshees on this side on the grounds that they are supposed to stick close by the Battle Standard Bearer to help them survive the odd round of combat.

I was deeply worried about Joseph’s Greatsword unit led by the Warrior Priest as, even with closed lists, I had a reasonable idea what they’d be packing (it’s always the Griffon Standard, show me an Empire player who doesn’t). My plan with those was to pin them down with Spirits for as long as physically possible, while my Banshees whittled away at them and I dealt with the elements of Joseph’s army I felt I could kill, which was basically all the war machines and possibly the Knights if I got lucky.

It started well as I realised I could potentially tie up the Helblaster crew and the Greatswords with one charge, and had enough Vanhel’s Danses to pull it off. Sadly Joseph’s heap of Dispel dice for having all his casters within the Circle proved more than up to the challenge and I was left feeling a bit overexposed.

I did have a chance to turn things on their head very early as Joseph’s wizard had decided not to chill with the Greatswords and, as a unit all by himself, was an eligible target for Banshee screams. A Leadership 8 target. Sadly he managed to survive with one wound left and promptly buried himself in the Greatswords next turn, while their attendant Priest worked on restoring those Wounds (but at least he wasn’t casting Soulfire). My second Banshee didn’t have the range to finish the job but did manage to shoo Joseph’s Pistoliers straight off the board with their first Panic test of the day.

The fast flank started going to bits as soon as Joseph’s turn began: my Ghouls were vapourised by a Mortar shot and his Giant lumbered out to engage my Dire Wolves quick sharp, while Joseph’s Knights (“are they Inner Circle, mate?” “no, they’re in a line!”) marched up to point blank range of mine so their Priest could let rip with Soulfire. I didn’t manage to Dispel it and the odds between the units tipped rather dramatically as a whole five Black Knights went to the bad place in one go.

At the top of turn two, I would have to get spicy.

Fortunately, the Master was out of the Knights’ charge arc, and so I formulated a plan. My Knights would charge Joseph’s Knights and sink as many attacks as they could into the Warrior Priest (finishing him off with a Killing Blow as it happens). The Master would sneak around their flank and cast a Danse on the Black Coach, bringing it close to the circle; close enough that one of my three other Danses would surely go off and propel the overpriced paperweight into the middle of Joseph’s army. Even if it flubbed its charge it would hopefully last long enough to spread some tasty Terror around and knock off a few war machine crews…

The plan went off, although it took every single Power die I had, my Power Stone and the Book of Arkhan (ran out first time, as usual) to get the chain of Danses through. By the time the charges, tests, redirections and post-combat panickings were done, Joseph’s artillery crew were all dead or engaged (the Spirit Host having also ploughed in to do its job on the Helblaster), half his Handgunners had been run down and the others were fleeing, and I’d even discovered that the Banshees can scream freely into a combat they are not personally engaged in (although if they are personally engaged, they have to scream at what they’re fighting).

The only fly in my ointment was that loose Giant roaming around the back of my fast flank. I hate Giants. I hate them so much. There’s no way of predicting what they’ll do, but their Stubbornness plus Terror-causing tendencies plus the heinous “automatically win by two” Yell and Bawl habit means it generally amounts to “not bloody go anywhere whilst being too tough to shift.” In theory a good Hand of Dust will sort them out but somehow I never quite want to risk a Necromancer in picking fights with them.

Joseph renewed hostilities by bringing down a Comet of Cassandora into the big combat in the centre. Once the dust from that had settled, one of my Banshees was wounded, half my Spirit Host were frazzled, and a whole rank of his own Greatswords had also gone to meet Morr in the great beyond. Storm of Cronos took yet more wounds off the ghosts, but not enough to open my charge lane.

I forget who charged who here: I think it must have been Joseph going for me, after I moved my Necromancers into the stone circle to take advantage of those extra dice for myself, and I know for a fact I wheeled the Coach around to get away from the Giant as best it could. I would surely have charged my Skeletons into what was left of those Greatswords if I could, so I’m forced to assume the Spirit Host died on my turn somehow after blocking my lane for the duration?

In any case, the combats went as well as might be expected. Depleted Knights couldn’t finish off many Zombies, what remained of the Greatswords didn’t have the mustard to fight off a Vampire Countess (who overran into the Master Engineer before he got any ideas about priming the Helblaster for one last volley) and the Giant didn’t quite finish off my Black Coach but undoubtedly would have done given another turn. Joseph had managed to call down another Comet of Cassandora before his Wizard Lord bought it, but sadly it didn’t land before the game formally ended. Sad face.

A Vampire Countess, Battle Standard Bearer, two Necromancers and two Banshees within the Circle is more than enough to overcome the opposition of some leaderless Knights and the dead weight of those Zombies: plenty of points, enough for a Victory to the Vampire Counts!

Hots and Nots

Warrior Priests are softer than I remember them being. I think I fixate too much on the damage potential of Soulfire and overlook that they’re really not that much harder than a regular Wizard. The Banshees remain excellent and become more so the more I become familiar with their targeting rules; there are all sorts of cheeky things they can do through not being a conventional shooting attack. This time, the Lore of Death was a mixed bag: I didn’t regret taking it but I do think Steal Soul is a spell you need to cast every turn or kind of forget about even trying (although it’s hard to calculate magical potential in a scenario as asymmetric as this one).

Necromancy continues to have an embarrassingly short range – even the 24″ is not that far when your caster is on foot and the board is six feet across, and the really important spells cap out at 18″. Also, as I predicted, the split deployment was a mare. Vampire Counts really need to stick together in a clump around the General and everything I left out on the other flank, including the Master, was basically a goner. The Coach only made it through because I had enough Danses to save the damn thing and while it did actually get to grow its scythes in this game, it only killed useless chaffy Handgunners and war machine crew it would normally (probably) never have got near. I’m still not convinced.

One thing I’ll add in conclusion is that this game really hammered home how great the sixth edition magic system is, as long as nobody’s boring and brings four Dispel Scrolls and decides to try and take it out of the match altogether. The dice fencing aspect brought a lot of laughs, especially with the sheer number of dice Joseph’s army was generating within the circle, and yet my superior starting pool kept me in the running right the way through. An unusual game against a heavily tailored list, but one of the most fun I’ve had since this whole sixth edition revival thing really got going. Kudos to Joseph for being such a sport about it all.

Next up: teardown and rebuild of the Vampire Counts list, then it’s back to homebrew: Bloodspell Extended Edition is coming along nicely and I intend to have developer’s notes ready alongside the book itself for a December launch. Be seeing you!

[WFB] Battle Report: A Wrong Turn on the Road to Zavastra

Just before all this malarkey with Nineteen Crows kicked into high gear, I was in London. The London Book Fair had been cancelled but I was there anyway, and had a spare day to play some socially-distanced no-handshakes Warhammer at the new Dark Sphere ‘megastore’ in Shepherd’s Bush. Also risking life and limb for some last jollity before the end were Niklaus Meurke (known for The Old World Lives podcast) and Joseph Bain (known for organising a bunch of London and Midlands sixth ed meetups while we in the West and Wales have sat on our asses since EGG).

We agreed on 3000 points and no Pitched Battles. I took a lot of photos but not a lot of notes (something has to suffer if I’m to concentrate on actually playing the game) and it’s now been long enough that I don’t remember enough for a blow by blow recap.

First up for the motley was Niklaus, with something pretty unusual.

Deployment: KISLEV.

Niklaus brought the Tzarina Katarina, a unit of Kossars with a Boyar, three units of Winged Lancers with Boyars, three units of Ungol Horse Archers (one quite large), the Gryphon Legion (packing War Banner) and Bronzino’s Galloper Guns. I no longer recall which Boyars had which kit (one definitely had an Enchanted Shield) or exactly what the Kislev spells are called (but Katarina had a breath weapon, a wall effect, a self-enhancement that made her fly and improved her combat stats, and a basic magic missile).

Given the sheer haste of his forces we opted for the Breakthrough scenario with him attacking.

Deployment: Sylvania..

I would be using the same list for both games: fortunately, I have written that down at least.

Margarita: Vampire Countess; level 2 wizard (Lore of Death: Dark Hand, Death Dealer, Doom and Darkness), Sword of Striking, Ring of the Night, Spell Familiar and Summon Wolves.
The Master: Master Necromancer: level 4 wizard (Necromancy: Invocation of Nehek, Hellish Vigour, Gaze of Nagash, Curse of Years), Wristbands of Black Gold, Black Periapt
Rosenkratz: Necromancer: level 2 wizard (Necromancy: Invocation of Nehek, Curse of Years), Book of Arkhan, Power Stone
Guildenstern: Necromancer: level 2 wizard (Necromancy: Invocation of Nehek, Vanhel’s Danse Macabre), Rod of Flaming Death
Whispering Nell: Wraith: Cursed Book
Walravius: Wight Lord: Army Standard, Flayed Hauberk

Templehof Militia: 30 Skeletons with light armour, spears, champion, standard and musician
Templehof Levy: 25 Zombies with standard and musician
Hounds of Verhungern: 10 Dire Wolves with champion
The Local People: 10 Ghouls with champion

Drakenhof Templars: 12 Black Knights with barding, champion, standard (Banner of the Barrows) and musician
Black Monks of St. Herod: 5 Spirit Hosts

Cora: Banshee
Clarice: Banshee
Lord Ruthven’s Repose: Black Coach

Opening gambits! As you can see, Niklaus didn’t go hell for leather or anything, opting for a sedate advance that kept his options (and his cannons’ fire lanes) open. For my part I raised a nice big blob of Zombies in the path of the central Lancers, shoved my Banshees up to begin the business of screaming a few rank bonuses away and standing in charge lanes, and made my usual ponderous forays forward. Sadly I made one quite major boo-boo with my early movement! The Spirit Host didn’t quite have the pace to get through that house in front of them, we didn’t think a Unit Strength 15 swarm should be able to pile into a small cottage, so I had to wheel them around it instead and leave a flank pointing at the Gryphon Legion, who took full advantage (as one might expect). Although they didn’t have a magic weapon to their name they did have a rank, a flank, a standard, a War Banner and superior Unit Strength, ensuring they’d win the round by at least two. Just to vex me even further, the Spirits’ formation wouldn’t allow me to move any extra models into combat and out of the Knights’ way, as there were no rear ranks for the models to be moved from!

I would have to do something decisive, and so I did something decisive. Here’s what the board looked like when I was done pushing my luck.

 

Predictably, the Black Coach had eaten a cannonball despite my best efforts, and Niklaus had swept away its attendant Ghouls with a Lancer charge and gone careening on into the Master, who was suddenly regretting being so stingy with his defence budget. “I don’t need the Cloak of Mists and Shadows,” I’d said, “he’ll never end up in combat anyway”.

In the centre, I’d been more successful. I Summoned some Wolves to threaten Niklaus’ cannons. He was forced to overinvest somewhat in destroying them, with two Horse Archer units and Bronzino himself turning around to finish off three mouldy lupines. I also pressed forward with my Wraith: she abandoned her post and joined up with the Zombies I’d just raised instead, preparing to deter the Lancers’ charge. BUT…

Her proximity to the Kislveite lines meant a number of Terror tests had to be taken. Niklaus passed most of them, except the test for the Gryphon Legion, who suddenly turned and pelted it out of combat! Suddenly, his left flank was looking a lot less secure, with the Black Knights and Spirits poised to charge across each other and potentially mess up two of his large Lancer blocks in one go…

Sadly, the Black Knights didn’t quite make it, but the Spirits chased down the fleeing Gryphon Legion, while on my other flank, Margarita and her associates absolutely flattened Niklaus’ Kossars in combat. I wasn’t terribly worried about the Knights having to eat a charge from Winged Lancers: with Toughness 4 and a 2+ save they were better equipped to laugh it off than most of my troops! The Master had also managed to hold out, somehow, and was still lending his formidable bucket o’ dice to my spellcasting efforts. This will become significant shortly.

 

What you see here is the impact of a successfully cast Doom and Darkness on the Tzarina and her big unit of Horse Archers, followed up by a double-six Banshee scream right into them. The Tzarina was left on one wound, although her “turn me into a frosty phoenix” spell ensured she made short work of Clarice in the fightin’ phase.

A “top of the midgame to ya” kind of image. My wall o’ summoned Zombies were now long gone, but a new block had joined them to protect the flank of the Skeleton unit and deter those surviving Lancers from trying anything.

After beating back the Lancers’ charge for a modest four casualties, my Knights (and Spirits) were now hopelessly out of position. Unable to march, they played no further part in the hostilities, while Niklaus’ Horse Archers finished off my Dire Wolves.

Not wanting to risk a rear charge from the Horse Archers on my Skeletons, I opted to try and block their lanes with the Wight Lord, whose 1+ save was enough to eat their attacks and, thanks to his Battle Standard, not that fussed about being outnumbered either. If the Tzarina tried anything he was done for but that would leave her in range of all my magic missiles.

Finally freed of Zombies, the central Lancer unit ploughed on into my Necromancers’ bunker, while the rest of Niklaus’ units ran hell for leather into my deployment zone, trying to salvage as many warm bodies (and necessary points total Broken Through) as they could.

The Tzarina elected to try something quite bold at this point, moving in to try and pin the Zombies down and save her cavalry. Sadly, even her frosty fun bird spell and breath weapon (dispelled) didn’t avail her and she ended up fleeing back into the tightening noose of Undead infantry, leaving a ragged handful of survivors to trickle past as the Zombies focused their attentions on her, the greater prize. The middle block of Lancers legged it too: Niklaus just couldn’t catch a break.

Victory to the Vampire Counts!

To Niklaus’ credit this was going to be a hard one for him to win on the victory condition. His individual units were so cheap and comparatively fragile that he’d struggle to get 1000 points’ worth through my lines unscathed without detouring at least one Lancer block around me, and with this much stuff on this size table there wasn’t really room for him to do that. My conservative approach to Vampire Generals meant he wasn’t likely to get the sudden death win from killing Margarita and polishing off crumbling units, either. In the early turns my poor movement and his speed advantage might have freed up some space for him, but that fortunate Terror test brought the game back to me.

Hots and Nots

The Lore of Death absolutely proved its worth here. I’m pretty sure Death Dealer was instrumental in seeing off those Lancers at the end, and of course the Banshee scream + Doom and Darkness power move came off about as perfectly as it could. Taking a Spell Familiar on Margarita was a sound choice as well, ensuring that I had a Death spell worth casting even though I only had a single caster.

However: the army really started to struggle magically when the Master dropped off. I wasn’t particularly threatened by a single level 4 caster, but I was also struggling to get any spells past her with only level 2s throwing a handful of dice around the place. Also, the sheer width of table involved here and the breadth on which I had to engage Niklaus’ forces meant my most expensive and powerful units were stranded once they’d broken through. Granted I should have set Margarita up a little more centrally and I probably could have saved the Master’s flank from collapsing, but I still found myself wanting for Aura of Dark Majesty towards the end of this one.

[WFB] Getting Schooled by Dr. Shiny

Ten years ago this month, I started teaching my arch-rival and nemesis and bestest friend ever Lawrence how to play Warmachine. I also started a blog, because I’d come home at the drop of a hat to start my teacher training and left the Warmachine scene of Greater Manchester behind and frankly, I was feeling a bit lonely. It’s been a long ten years and it hasn’t always been much fun, and a lot of things have had to be left behind in the meantime.

But not everything.

Lawrence and I go way, way back. We’ve known each other for well over twenty years. And in that time, Lawrence’s long-suffering, long-serving Skaven – the first opponents for my putative Army of Sylvania fifteen years ago last Christmas – have never managed to beat my Vampire Counts.

Until now.

Preamble

I won’t say that playing Lawrence again was the only reason I went down to the Exeter Games Gathering, but it was certainly up there. It’s only an hour’s train ride for him, so he had no excuse. By the time he arrived I was struggling to formulate a coherent thought and so we opted for a nice straightforward Pitched Battle, bo-ring as it might be.

I was testing out my new “three casters? take Death!” approach and, at the last moment, dropped both my Bound Spells in favour of a single base Spirit Host because I felt myself wanting for chaff. The resultant army looked like this:

  • Countess Carmilla: level 2 wizard, Death magic (Death Dealer, Wind of Death), Sword of Striking, Ring of the Night, Black Periapt, Aura of Dark Majesty
  • Rosenkratz: level 2 wizard, Necromancy (Invocation of Nehek, Hand of Dust)
  • Guildenstern: level 2 wizard, Necromancy (Invocation of Nehek, Gaze of Nagash)
  • Whispering Nell: Wraith with Cursed Book
  • 30 Skeletons: light armour, spears, full command
  • 20 Zombies: standard and musician
  • 10 Huntsmen
  • Spirit Host (1 base)
  • 8 Black Knights: barding, full command
  • 8 Black Knights: barding, full command
  • Banshee
  • Banshee

Lawrence, it turned out, was also testing out a new approach, which he’d never had the balls to attempt back in the day:

  • Grey Seer Makkiavelli: level 4 wizard (Skitterleap, Pestilent Breath, Vermintide, Plague): Death Globes, whatever the Skaven equivalent of the Wristbands of Black Gold are called
  • Fooko: Warlock Engineer with all the trimmings plus Storm Daemon and Dispel Scroll
  • Derridaa: Warlock Engineer with all the trimmings plus Warpscroll
  • Kirkegaad: Chieftain with shield, heavy armour, Bands of Power and Sword of Battle
  • 30 Clanrats: full command, Warpfire Thrower team
  • 30 Clanrats: full command, Ratling Gun team
  • 4 Giant Rat packs
  • 5 Rat Swarm bases
  • 10 Night Runners: slings, additional hand weapons
  • 28 Plague Monks: additional hand weapons, full command
  • Warp Lightning Cannon
  • 6 Plague Censer Bearers

This is, as you’ll appreciate, quite a toothy Skaven army. I remember Lawrence’s Skaven not being this tuned. It’s my own fault, I know perfectly well that plastic Plague Monks have happened since the day, I was there when he built the cannon, and Skaven have ALWAYS had the option of four Warp Lightnings in a turn. It’s just… a lot of that slipped my mind, lulled out of consciousness by Lawrence’s relentless whinging about how rubbish his Skaven are. And back in the day, I was being carried along by a bullshit Storm of Chaos list which could put Magic Resistance on everything worth zapping and yeet three units of Dire Wolves into the back of his army on turn two. This sort of thing annoyed and/or worried Lawrence and left me able to coast over the top of the Skaven blocks quite effectively once the Rat Swarm was out of the way.

That’s why I felt confident enough to set up like this.

The plan was to set up a picket line with the Huntsmen, fleeing when Lawrence’s troops started to close, and pull a unit of Knights over to that side as well, with the remaining units jammed up his grill to occupy the Plague Monks and Rats. And that worked fine.

But that was the entire extent of the plan. The rest of my game boiled down to “try and win a magic-missile-off with the army which has the best magic missile in the game and can cast it three times, two with better-than-average odds of Irresistible Force, every turn, and also outshoots me by a country mile.”

And the other thing I hadn’t expected was that Lawrence would Skitterleap his Grey Seer into the back of my army and proceed to chain cast Vermintide and Pestilent Breath into the back of my Skeleton unit two turns on the trot. This after he wiped half of them out with an Irresistible Plague on the very first turn.

Frankly, it was courteous of him to blow up his own Warpfire Thrower, kill a rank of Clanrats with an overenthusiastic Vermintide, fall short with all but one of his Warp Lightning Cannon shots, and have Makkiavelli drop his Death Globes on his own feet twice. That, plus panicking his Night Runners off the table and making the one good move at the start, at least kept me in the game until the fourth round. At that point, once my Knights had been shot to shit trying to get into a decent position, I opted to call it a day.

Maybe if I’d had a bigger Spirit Host, and a Book of Arkhan somewhere to guarantee me a Vanhel’s Danse to cast… maybe if I’d not decided to play a defensive game against an army that had no reason to close the distance when it could slaughter me from 18-24″ away… maybe if I’d had a better night’s sleep beforehand… maybe if I’d treated my oldest friend with something more than contempt and actually planned to give him a proper fight…

If ifs and buts were candies and nuts we’d all be diabetic, I suppose. I did consider leaving the army in a skip or something on the way home – it’s been fifteen years, and I often feel trapped by nostalgia, like I’m trying to get back to 2004 and pretend the time between then and now didn’t happen, and I can’t deny the symbolism of anniversaries and old enemies and final defeats.

It’s been ten years and in that time the whole ‘hobby blogger’ phenomenon has boomed and bust. I effectively put the blog on life support back in 2018, but resolved to give it a final year and a fair go, and this is the best note to go out on, I think. A couple of lads from Plymouth shoving some toy soldiers around, and walking to the station in the rain.

Once I built a railroad; now it’s done.

[WFB] Battle Report: Von Carsteins at Caerwysg

WFB Sixth Edition.
6000 points.
Vampire Counts vs. Bretonnians and Dogs of War.

Frankly, if that doesn’t wake you up inside, I don’t know what will. It certainly kept me going for about eight hours, even though I hadn’t actually slept for two nights on the trot and was fast succumbing to ye pestilence and, frankly, was only kept functional by a hideous cocktail of OG Relentless and cranberry juice. Lee hadn’t had the best night either, with two fire alarms going off in his hotel during the wee hours, but damn it all we’d been planning this for weeks and we weren’t going to let anything stop us now.

Doesn’t that make it all worthwhile?

Neither force was what you’d call “legal”, although the conventions regarding numbers of Lords and Heroes, as well as Core, Special and Rare troops under them, were still obeyed. The goal was for myself and Lee to plonk our entire painted collections on the board and give the other attendees of yer actual Exeter Games Gathering something to gawp at in between doing each other over. If you have a 6’x4′ table for the whole day, you might as well make use of it!

We cobbled together a makeshift scenario by mashing up the Flank Attack and Capture ones from the WFB rulebook. Flank Attack would make the most of Lee’s divided forces by not actually considering them the same thing; Capture would relieve us of the need to calculate or even consider Victory Points, with victory determined by Who Was Closest To The Shed at the end. The well-paid and foolishly courageous Dogs of War would start entrenched behind enough linear obstacles to make a Dwarf blush (to ensure I couldn’t sweep them all away by turn two), while the Bretonnians would advance from a flank of Lee’s choosing at the top of turn three (giving me a turn to at least brace for impact before the inevitable charge).

We needed something suitably high stakes to draw these mighty forces together, so I elected not to bring the Carstein Ring, and instead place it within the retirement cottage of one Felix Mann, Esq, once of Altdorf and now long deceased. Why was this important? Look at who showed up…

Vampire Counts (attacking)

  • Mannfred von Carstein
  • Lord Ruthven (Vampire Lord on Zombie Dragon; some kit which ended up being totally irrelevant)
  • Countess Carmilla (Vampire Countess on foot; Summon Bats and Spectral Attendants)
  • Sir Francis Varney (Vampire Thrall in Wolf Form)
  • Walravius (Wight Lord Battle Standard Bearer, waving the Hell Banner about)
  • Whispering Nell (Wraith with the Cursed Book)
  • Rosenkratz, Guildenstern and Haeckl (three Necromancers with a Power Stone and Dispel Scroll apiece)
  • 30 Skeleton Spearmen
  • 20 Skeleton Crossbowmen
  • 20 Zombies
  • 2 (independent) Bat Swarms
  • 10 Ghouls
  • 10 Huntsmen
  • 10 Dire Wolves
  • 20 Drakenhof Guard (with the Screaming Banner)
  • 28 Black Knights (one unit of 12 with the Drakenhof Banner, two units of 8 with nowt fancy to their name)
  • 1 very large Spirit Host
  • 2 Banshees
  • 2 Black Coaches

Dogs of War (defending)

  • Lorenzo Lupo
  • an unnamed but courageous Hireling Wizard, late of Bretonnia no doubt, brandishing the Staff of Sorcery (Lee’s spare Damsel coming out to play)
  • a foolhardy Paymaster
  • Leopold’s Leopard Company
  • the Marksmen of Miragliano
  • a Pikeman company whose resemblance to the Alcatini Fellowship is entirely coincidental
  • an off-brand Crossbowman company
  • Tichi-Huichi’s Raiders
  • Bronzino and a Galloper Gun
  • Dadallo and the Birdmen of Catrazza
  • Lumpin Croop and his Fighting Cocks
  • the Giants of Albion and Hengist

Bretonnians (flanking)

  • King Louen Leoncoeur
  • Morgiana la Fay
  • The Green Knight
  • a Paladin on a Pegasus
  • a Paladin not on a Pegasus (bearing the Battle Standard)
  • two footslogging Paladins
  • a slightly overwhelmed Damsel with the Silver Mirror
  • half a dozen Grail Knights (playing escort to the Fay and the BSB)
  • eight Knights Errant
  • two dozen Bowmen
  • a dozen Men At Arms
  • two fistfuls of Mounted Yeomen
Lee felt himself stretched pretty thin by this engagement, but had the advantage of a strong defensive position for his Pikemen and an excellent viewpoint for the Marksmen of Miragliano. His skirmishers occupied the wood on the left, while the Giants of Albion reluctantly divided their attentions, ready to counter-punch the oncoming horde.
Mannfred isn’t feeling very optimistic about his positioning, but he has the only Danse Macabre on the field, so without him the infantry will be lucky to reach the halfway line, and I’m not leaving him on his own without a cavalry unit to hide out in.
Lorenzo Lupo stares the Vampire Count down. These pikes are going nowhere!
In many ways my choice of flanking force was dictated by the terrain. My Huntsmen could only take cover behind this ruined chapel, while the Black Coaches didn’t have any other way into the lines that wouldn’t take them into a hedge and certain destruction. The Dire Wolves are over here because they’re still pretty nippy even if Mannfred can’t help them march; the Black Knights will turn into the bulk of the army and pick up speed later. The Spirit Host is just out of sight on the left; if the Bretonnians show up on that side, I’m confident that 24 Ethereal wounds will at least slow them down.
On the other flank, I planned to have these Ghouls spread out to block the Bretonnians should they show up, while Ruthven is there to deliver Terror, dragon breath and Death Magic into the heart of the Dogs’ line. Allegedly.

We both figured the Dogs of War would need a lot of luck to make it through the game, but things would doubtless turn Lee’s way when the Bretonnians arrived. Were we right? Read on…

Opening Gambits (Turns 1 and 2)

My advance was immediately checked when the Green Knight showed up on turn one! The ethereal crew don’t fancy their chances any more, and to be honest I was already thinking of this flank as a write-off. My suspicions were confirmed when the Galloper Gun smashed one coach to powder with its first damn shot, and the Green Knight spent three turns making Spirits go bye-bye. Lee’s rolls for the git’s Dolorous Blade or whatever it’s called were terrifying; six, six and five extra attacks in a row!
Mannfred drove his Knights headlong into the Pikes. Not the best idea he’s ever had, especially when I realised they didn’t actually have the “sod your obstacles I hit you on threes” standard after all, but Pikemen are only WS and S 3; I’d get to roll some hefty armour saves, and with a bit of luck I’d have Lord Ruthven joining them in that conveniently dragon-shaped hole on their flank. Sadly, Lee managed to dispel Vanhel’s Danse Macabre and cast The Bear’s Anger on his Paymaster, making him big and mean enough to hold off a whole unit of raised Zombies all by himself! What you see here is the impact of static combat resolution on Knights who’ve achieved nothing but a dead unit champion.
On the left flank, the charging Giant stumbled as my Hunstmen did a bit of baiting and fleeing. Hengist was now open to a charge from the Dire Wolves, and my Black Coach had a lane on Bologs (or is it Cachtorr?). Impact hits weren’t enough to fell the brute, however, and it proceeded to Yell and Bawl for three turns on the trot. Automatically losing combat by two each time was enough to grind both units into dust. BORING!
Something similar happened on this side. On its charge, Cachtorr (or is it Bologs?) Yelled and Bawled, denying Lord Ruthven and his faithful steed any chance to get a wound in edgeways. On his next turn, Lord Ruthven proceeded to Miscast, lobbing himself out of the combat and narrowly avoiding the hedge!

Bretonnia Rides (Turns 3 and 4)

The Knights arrived, and promptly… achieved nothing for an entire turn, as the Yeomen failed their fear test, refused to charge my Skeleton Crossbowmen, and tied up the far braver units behind them. Similar events occured in the midfield, where the Men At Arms wanted nothing to do with fighting Ghouls and the Peasant Bowmen learned that actually, Ghouls are quite dangerous in a fight.
Morgiana took exactly one swig from her magical chalice, chugging the lot and hurling a Comet of Cassandora into the middle of the undead lines! As if that wasn’t enough, Mannfred’s attempt at Hellish Vigour to improve his Knights’ odds of crossing the fence was met with the Silver Mirror, dispelling the spell and putting a wound on him to boot. Even the Zombies were unable to turn the tide, as Lorenzo Lupo generated sufficient surplus wounds from challenging the Black Knights’ champion to cancel out his unit’s loss of rank bonus and draw the combat!

Desperate Times (Turns 5 and 6)

In response, the Undead lines turned. The Huntsmen rallied and ran to intercept the Bretonnians, along with the leftmost unit of Black Knights. Their counterparts on the right charged Bologs (or Cachtorr) in an effort to save the Dragon from another round of Yelling and Bawling. Banshees and Wraiths were hurled toward the centre of the field in an effort to put the Cursed Book in play and whittle down the Dogs of War further, but a nasty surprise or two lay in wait. Firstly: Leopold’s Leopard Company are immune to psychology, and therefore to Banshee wails. Secondly…
Secondly, the Knights arrived too late. Cachtorr (or possibly Bologs) took matters in hand (or rather forehead), nutting the Zombie Dragon to death. I’d be pissed off about this, but “nutted to death by Giant” is a pretty epic way to go. The Knights didn’t quite manage to finish him off, he passed his Stubborn AF break test, and next turn King Louen charged and proceeded to go through the Knights like a woodchipper. In back, the Yeomen charged my summoned Zombies in the rear, breaking their ranks and buying Lorenzo Lupo another round…
… which he used to challenge Mannfred, taking the Count of Sylvania on mano-e-mano in the Classical style! Still hampered by the hedgerow which his Knights had yet to cross, Mannfred wasn’t quite able to strike down the mercenary general, while Lorenzo only landed two blows of his own; not enough to put Mannfred out of his misery.
On the other flank, Sir Francis Varney seized the day. An 18 inch charge and a 1+ armour save delivered him safely into the Crossbowmen, and three S7 attacks saw them broken before his onslaught.
The Drakenhof Guard produced impressive results in their charge against the Leopard Company. Although their Screaming Banner and Hell Banner power combo was wasted on the fearless pikemen, Leopold was cut down by a Killing Blow from the Guards’ Champion, and the Guard – aided by a timely cast of Death Dealer and Hellish Vigour – killed enough of the Leopard Company that they actually broke from combat on its own!
Even without Leopold, the Pikemen rallied, but this was do-or-die turn for the Vampire Counts and they didn’t let me down. Lord Ruthven charged and butchered the Mounted Yeomen, and the Drakenhof Guard were impelled into combat with an Irresistible Danse Macabre, turning both combats in favour of the Undead. Leopold’s men were run down, and while Lorenzo just about held his ground…
… the Paymaster was not so fortunate. Sir Francis was thirsty, and as the Paymaster fell beneath his blade, disaster struck the Dogs of War. Lorenzo, one of the Giants, and the Marksmen of Miragliano all failed their Panic tests and bolted, leaving the Sylvanians in control of the objective! And just to cap everything off, I managed to dispel the Comet.

There followed a chain of events which I was too tired to photograph, and I hope Lee can supply suitable imagery in good time. But here’s what happened.

Mannfred was finally able to cross the hedge and take control of the Mann residence. All he had to do was survive one last turn. To that end, he and all his Necromancers attempted to cast Invocations to restore him to full capacity of Wounds. Lee Dispelled Mannfred’s Invocation, and I failed to cast the other three. Suddenly, everything was back on the knife edge again.

In the middle ground, I was able to Summon Bats, redeploy Ghouls, and shove Skeletons forward so that Lee’s Knights had very few charge opportunities left.

The second Giant stumbled in its charge on Carmilla and her guard; about to Jump Up and Down, the drunken oaf ended up falling at Carmilla’s feet, and she took great pleasure in avenging her last outing against the Giants by cutting it down in person.

King Louen descended on the Necromancers, cutting their zombie bodyguard to ribbons but leaving the casters themselves alive.

Hope, such as it was, rested with one man…

Whirling his Delirious Blade about him, the Green Knight, immortal defender of Bretonnia, charged in and challenged the Vampire Count to single combat. Lacking any alternative, Mannfred drew his sword again and hoped against hope that he could prevail. It was not to be. The Ethereal care not for hedgerows, and so the Green Knight fought at full efficiency, liberating Mannfred from the mortal coil.

Hopefully, this epic final clash is not spoiled too much by my errant fingertip making its way into the photograph.

Defeat! Defeat at the very last round of combat on the very last turn! Honestly, I couldn’t ask for a better way to go out than that. When you’re playing a supervillain like Mannfred, hubris and trickery and defeat snatched from the jaws of victory by an immortal force of righteous fury is fitting and there’s no bones about it.

Lee was delighted at the chance to field all his forces together and for that matter so do I; one never normally gets to take things like Dragons and so many spellcasters that the Lore of Death on two of them doesn’t feel like a waste. On top of all that, it was a delightfully close game which could easily have gone either way, and if we played it again (ideally when we weren’t both half mad with sleep deprivation) I for one would do things a little differently.

I’d probably stack the cavalry on that open flank, and let the Spirits lead the charge into those pike blocks (since they don’t give a monkey’s chuff about hedges). That might leave my infantry lagging a bit, but to be honest, their job was to ferry the spellcasters and Wraith forward and then block as many charge lanes as possible. I wouldn’t change the list much, except for maybe slipping Call Winds onto Carmilla for the early turns… and of course, not leaving home without the Banner of the Barrows.